Archive for category Brad

Over-stacking the Narrative Deck: True Detective’s Messy Season 2 by Brad Windhauser

Over-stacking the Narrative Deck: True Detective’s Messy Season 2 by Brad Windhauser TV shows can fail for several reasons. A project might be overly ambitious, the actors a poor fit for their respective roles, and/or the direction stiff, lacking, etc. In the case of HBO’s second season of True Detective, the main issue is the […]

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Allow Drafting to Evolve Your Stories: Using What Is to Help You See What It Could Be by Brad Windhauser

Allow Drafting to Evolve Your Stories: Using What Is to Help You See What It Could Be by Brad Windhauser What your story will become is usually quite different than what you imagined it to be when you began typing. The beauty of being the person adding words to the page is that you get […]

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A Pet’s Point of View: Showing not Telling in Disney’s Feast by Brad Windhauser

A Pet’s Point of View: Showing not Telling in Disney’s Feast by Brad Windhauser When writing, I’ll explore any topic or idea that piques my interest. However, I typically avoid a child’s point of view—I prefer a narrator and a vantage point infused with more maturity than the average child is capable of—and I never […]

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Publishing News for Brad Windhauser

Brad Windhauser is happy to announce that his current short story “Fight or Flight” was just published in Jonathan, issue 8 (available in print and online). In addition he is presenting a paper,  “Judging Your Content: The Benefits of Subjectivity” at the North American Review Bicentennial Creating Writing & Literature Conference June 13th in Cedar […]

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In Case You Have Missed Them: Authors to Be Reading Now by Brad Windhauser

In Case You Have Missed Them: Authors to Be Reading Now by Brad Windhauser Last month, we discussed writers who have influenced us. Understanding your influences helps you best appreciate how he or she is able to craft their work. Doing so allows you to learn from these stories, poems, plays, and screenplays. Past work, […]

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Re-reading Your Influences: Beyond the Tip of Hemingway’s Iceberg by Brad Windhauser

Re-reading Your Influences: Beyond the Tip of Hemingway’s Iceberg by Brad Windhauser My senior year of undergrad, I took an upper-division grammar class, a course designed not to teach us grammar but rather to explore all the potential of the English language. Doing so would compel us to pay closer attention to our sentence structure […]

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A Month of Truth: What Role Does Truth Play in Writing? By Brad Windhauser

A Month of Truth: What Role Does Truth Play in Writing? By Brad Windhauser The truth is relative. This is either a quote I picked up somewhere or it represents the spirit of something I read. For the longest time, I didn’t quite grasp how or why this was true: facts are facts, right? This […]

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Working with Relationships in Fiction by Brad Windhauser

Working with Relationships in Fiction by Brad Windhauser One of the things I admire about non-fiction writers—let’s say David Sedaris—is how openly they write about their  lives; specifically, their close relationships. In the case of Sedaris, outside of the death of his mother, it appears that nothing is off limits, and his books have contained […]

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The Business of Writing: Editing to Suit Market Demands by Brad Windhauser

The Business of Writing: Editing to Suit Market Demands by Brad Windhauser When I watch a movie or read a book and then encounter a forced happy ending, I get annoyed. There’s nothing wrong with a happy ending; however, when it doesn’t suit what the plot and characters have set in motion, it feels forced. […]

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The Year That Was: Reflecting on 2014 and Looking Ahead to 2015 by Brad Windhauser

The Year That Was: Reflecting on 2014 and Looking Ahead to 2015 by Brad Windhauser When I was a kid, the approach of Christmas made me giddy: the decorated tree, my aunt’s delicious cookies, the large presents, and the time off school. When I was in college, the holiday season meant more customers (and tips) […]

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