Archive for category Reviews

David Fincher’s Gone Girl – Preserving Your Story When Adapting a Novel to the Screen [Spoilers late in the article] by Brad Windhauser

David Fincher’s Gone Girl – Preserving Your Story When Adapting a Novel to the Screen [Spoilers late in the article] by Brad Windhauser I’m a fan of Flynn’s novel, Gone Girl, and I have been eagerly awaiting David Fincher’s adaptation (as I am huge fan of the director’s work). Like most fans, though, I was […]

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The Book Thief: The Problem with Choosing the Wrong (or any) Narrator in a Script (Review)

The Book Thief: The Problem with Choosing the Wrong Narrator (Review) by Brad Windhauser No, I haven’t read The Book Thief, but when I saw previews for film version of The Book Thief with a friend, she wanted to go—how bad could anything starring Geoffrey Rush and Emily Watson be? The film’s good, though the […]

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Saving Mr. Banks – and the Audience: The Cathartic Release of Motion Pictures (Review)

by Jennie Jarvis Recently, I had a chance to view a sneak preview of the upcoming Disney movie Saving Mr. Banks. In this film, the “Man Behind the Mouse” – Walt Disney himself (Tom Hanks) – fights to win the rights to make Mary Poppins into a movie musical. Standing in his way is Mrs. […]

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Don’t Let Go – Gravity (A Review)

by Jennie Jarvis In his book Write Screenplays That Sell The Ackerman Way, Hal Ackerman argues that Theme is the enemy of a screenwriter. “Theme leads to predictability,” he states, and while I don’t know if I would accept this statement as a blanket rule for all film writing, I understand where he is going […]

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John Taylor’s In the Pleasure Groove (review) – The Benefits of Reading Across Genre

John Taylor’s In the Pleasure Groove (review) – The Benefits of Reading Across Genre by Brad Windhauser Sometimes when you know your strengths lie in writing a particular genre (say fiction or non-fiction), you stick to that genre.  I don’t know that Stephen King is readying a book of lyrical poems any time soon.  David […]

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Gatsby Not So Great — The Dangers of Adapting a Book to the Screen (Review of The Great Gatsby)

Gatsby Not So Great — The Dangers of Adapting a Book to the Screen (Review of The Great Gatsby) by Brad Windhauser I watch a little TV, and mostly I end up watching singing competitions like The Voice and The X Factor.  Like most people, I get sad pleasure out of watching contestant hopefuls butcher […]

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The Way, Way Back: A Love Letter To Actors Everywhere (Review)

By Jennie Jarvis This evening, I had the opportunity to attend an advance screening of the film The Way, Way Back, which will open in theaters everywhere on July 5th. If you follow film news at all, then you probably know that this film was the biggest acquisition at the Sundance Film Festival and it […]

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Trance: A Mosaic of Memory (Review)

By Jennie Jarvis I can’t tell you how many times I have seen beginning screenwriters cling to the notion that they HAVE to use flashbacks in their work in order to tell their story. “How else can I show that my character’s actions are motivated by the fact that she was molested by her father/neighbor/uncle/priest/clown […]

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Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never let Me Go (Review)

Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never let Me Go Some books take their time drawing you in.  Kazuo Ishiguro’s dystopian novel Never Let Me Go is a perfect example, though once it has you, it carries you on an emotionally satisfying (and at times touching and sad) journey. It’s hard to discuss the book without revealing a few […]

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The Dark Knight Rises (Review)

Recently released on DVD, Blu-ray, iTunes, etc. (Dec. 4th, actually), Christopher Nolan’s fantastic The Dark Knight Rises arrives with more than a few lessons on ambitious movie-making and storytelling.  Some critics—professional and amateur—have embraced this film for the thrill ride it is (or at least at times can be); others deride the film for being […]

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