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Using Pinterest As a Research Tool

  by Jennie Jarvis As a fiction writer, most of my job entails making crap up. Yes, my stories are based in realities, and it’s important for those realties to ring true in the hearts and minds of my readers. Sometimes, this means doing a little traditional research. Lately, I’ve been spending hours watching videos […]

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Research Tips From A Librarian by Kate Neff

5writers.com welcomes Kate Neff to the site this month! Kate has worked in the library setting for over 15 years, from the public library, to colleges, to the public school system. It’s hard for her to say which is her favorite, but there is never a dull day no matter which kind of library one works […]

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When The Muse Is Elusive

by Ron Hayes What does research have to do with poetry and why in the world would a poet ever need to do research? Ever been asked this question? Ever asked it yourself? When the term “research” crops up in a conversation amongst you and your poet friends, do they look at you funny and […]

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Write What You Know—But What If Your Knowledge Hits a Wall? By Brad Windhauser

Write What You Know—But What If Your Knowledge Hits a Wall? By Brad Windhauser Write What You Know. I interpret this oldest-of-writing adages a few different ways. First, I believe it encourages me to explore the things that matter to me. Second, it suggests that I impose my world view on my work—my truth, basically. […]

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My Big Ol’ Mountain of Books

By Darlene Cah Like all of the writers I know, I have a serious addiction to books, getting lost in the lives of characters that come to life on the page, immersing myself in their problems, their relationships, their exploits, their worlds. I’ll order two or three books, then I’ll get one of the many […]

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The Bard Was Right. To Thine Own Self…

by Ron Hayes Weird year so far. As a poet, I’m deeply affected by the things that go on around me. As a teacher, there always seems to be a lot going on. Typically, these goings-on find their way into the poems I put on the page, but this year has been unusually distracting. With […]

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What I’ve Been Reading This Year, with a Special Nod to Laskowski’s Bystanders by Brad Windhauser

What I’ve Been Reading This Year, with a Special Nod to Laskowski’s Bystanders by Brad Windhauser         I’m halfway to my read-50-books-this-year goal, and although I have enjoyed many of the 25 books I have read thus far, I don’t have a favorite. I liked Yanagihara’s A Little Life, although I felt […]

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Guide Your Reader with Smooth, Clear Transitions by Brad Windhauser

Guide Your Reader with Smooth, Clear Transitions by Brad Windhauser When I received notes on my first novel, Regret, one of the first things mentioned related to a character moving from outside to inside. In one paragraph he’s interacting with a person by his car on the street. A few sentences later, he’s inside the […]

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Switch Off Work Brain. Switch On Writer Brain

By Darlene Cah Most writers, even those with published books, have some kind of “day job,” whether they’re teachers, administrative assistants, attorneys, mail carriers or working in any number or other jobs. For some, writing time is a welcome respite from the stress of life in a cube. For me, it’s a difficult transition. My […]

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“As Far as I Know, the Galleys Are Still in Canada” by April L. Ford

This month, author April L. Ford shares one of the lessons she learned transitioning from a writer to a published author.  “As Far as I Know, the Galleys Are Still in Canada” by April L. Ford In summer 2014, when my U.S. publisher asked if any of my Canadian contacts would be interested in helping […]

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