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What I’ve Been Reading This Year, with a Special Nod to Laskowski’s Bystanders by Brad Windhauser

What I’ve Been Reading This Year, with a Special Nod to Laskowski’s Bystanders by Brad Windhauser         I’m halfway to my read-50-books-this-year goal, and although I have enjoyed many of the 25 books I have read thus far, I don’t have a favorite. I liked Yanagihara’s A Little Life, although I felt […]

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Guide Your Reader with Smooth, Clear Transitions by Brad Windhauser

Guide Your Reader with Smooth, Clear Transitions by Brad Windhauser When I received notes on my first novel, Regret, one of the first things mentioned related to a character moving from outside to inside. In one paragraph he’s interacting with a person by his car on the street. A few sentences later, he’s inside the […]

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Switch Off Work Brain. Switch On Writer Brain

By Darlene Cah Most writers, even those with published books, have some kind of “day job,” whether they’re teachers, administrative assistants, attorneys, mail carriers or working in any number or other jobs. For some, writing time is a welcome respite from the stress of life in a cube. For me, it’s a difficult transition. My […]

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“As Far as I Know, the Galleys Are Still in Canada” by April L. Ford

This month, author April L. Ford shares one of the lessons she learned transitioning from a writer to a published author.  “As Far as I Know, the Galleys Are Still in Canada” by April L. Ford In summer 2014, when my U.S. publisher asked if any of my Canadian contacts would be interested in helping […]

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Every Line A Break, Every Break A Transition

by Ron Hayes In poetry, transitioning from idea to idea in a poem (or scene to scene, or between characters’ points of view, or what have you) seems a lot less complicated than in other genres of writing. You’d think it’s as simple as beginning a new stanza: end the line, hit the Return key […]

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Making the Leap From Scene to Scene: Transitions

by Jennie Jarvis When sitting down to write a story, it’s so easy to get caught up in “bullet point” thinking: This happens, then this happens, then this happens. But, if you don’t pay attention to the transitions – how you get from point to point – then a reader or viewer can feel like […]

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National Poetry Month Begins!

by Ron Hayes Hello dear readers and Happy April! Once again Eliot’s “cruellest month” is upon us and I couldn’t be happier. We have a tremendous National Poetry Month planned for you here at 5writers.com. Let’s get to it! One of the oldest adages in writing is to write what you know. While I take […]

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Writer as Actor

By Darlene Cah One of the most important lessons I learned as an improv actor was to always enter a scene with an emotion. As improvisers we had no idea what the scene was about, or where it would go, who our characters were, and what they’re relationships were to each other. We figured it […]

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Happy Tears and Sad Laughter: Displaying Emotions In A Human Way

by Jennie Jarvis In 2011, my father died of cancer. I had a great relationships with my dad, so, as you can imagine, this really sucked. When it came time to plan his funeral, however, I refused to let the event be depressing. My dad hated when things got too serious, always preferring campy action […]

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Knowing When and How to Show Your Characters’ Emotions by Brad Windhauser

Knowing When and How to Show Your Characters’ Emotions by Brad Windhauser Emotions are a tricky thing. Not because they have the ability to overtake our brains, compelling us to do both bad and good things. No, they’re tricky because everyone feels different things in different situations, and if you think someone understands your version […]

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