Switch Off Work Brain. Switch On Writer Brain

By Darlene Cah Most writers, even those with published books, have some kind of “day job,” whether they’re teachers, administrative assistants, attorneys, mail carriers or working in any number or other jobs. For some, writing time is a welcome respite from the stress of life in a cube. For me, it’s a difficult transition. My […]

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“As Far as I Know, the Galleys Are Still in Canada” by April L. Ford

This month, author April L. Ford shares one of the lessons she learned transitioning from a writer to a published author.  “As Far as I Know, the Galleys Are Still in Canada” by April L. Ford In summer 2014, when my U.S. publisher asked if any of my Canadian contacts would be interested in helping […]

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Every Line A Break, Every Break A Transition

by Ron Hayes In poetry, transitioning from idea to idea in a poem (or scene to scene, or between characters’ points of view, or what have you) seems a lot less complicated than in other genres of writing. You’d think it’s as simple as beginning a new stanza: end the line, hit the Return key […]

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Making the Leap From Scene to Scene: Transitions

by Jennie Jarvis When sitting down to write a story, it’s so easy to get caught up in “bullet point” thinking: This happens, then this happens, then this happens. But, if you don’t pay attention to the transitions – how you get from point to point – then a reader or viewer can feel like […]

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National Poetry Month & Anna Rose Welch

    by Ron Hayes Very near to where I live there also lives a small, horrible, twisted, stunted, shrivel of a brain that happens, sadly, to be attached to a state legislator named Brad Roae. This tragedy of grey matter recently gave voice to what I fear as both a poet and an educator. […]

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National Poetry Month Begins!

by Ron Hayes Hello dear readers and Happy April! Once again Eliot’s “cruellest month” is upon us and I couldn’t be happier. We have a tremendous National Poetry Month planned for you here at 5writers.com. Let’s get to it! One of the oldest adages in writing is to write what you know. While I take […]

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Writing Their Stories: Divergent Approaches to Writing Diverse Characters by Allen Gorney

5Writers welcomes guest writer Allen Gorney back to our blog! Allen Gorney is a writer and actor. He currently teaches at Full Sail University in Winter Park, Florida. His forthcoming novel The Scottish Bitch was released on March 17, 2016 under the name Jameson Tabard by Beating Windward Press. You can find him online at www.jamesontabard.com. […]

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Diversify your Diversity by Nicole Oquendo

5Writers.com welcomes Nicole Oquendo to the site! Nicole Oquendo is a writer, educator, and editor interested in multimodal compositions and translations of nonfiction and poetry. She is a member of the Sundress Publications Board of Directors, as well as an Assistant Editor for Flaming Giblet Press, the Nonfiction Editor of The Florida Review, and the […]

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Permission to Keep Going by April L. Ford

Permission to Keep Going by April L. Ford April 1, 2015 was a huge day for me: My first book, The Poor Children: Stories, debuted worldwide. The manuscript had been chosen from among several hundred entries to receive Grand Prize for the Santa Fe Writers Project 2013 Literary Awards Program for Fiction. While I delighted […]

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Should the Need for Diversity Become a Requirement? By Brad Windhauser

Should the Need for Diversity Become a Requirement? By Brad Windhauser 2016’s Oscar nominations generated a lot of controversy. In particular, the acting categories were deemed “too white” due to the complete lack of non-white nominees. Should the Academy have ensured that their nominations better represented diversity? I don’t want to enter this particular debate, […]

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