My Big Ol’ Mountain of Books

By Darlene Cah Like all of the writers I know, I have a serious addiction to books, getting lost in the lives of characters that come to life on the page, immersing myself in their problems, their relationships, their exploits, their worlds. I’ll order two or three books, then I’ll get one of the many […]

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The Bard Was Right. To Thine Own Self…

by Ron Hayes Weird year so far. As a poet, I’m deeply affected by the things that go on around me. As a teacher, there always seems to be a lot going on. Typically, these goings-on find their way into the poems I put on the page, but this year has been unusually distracting. With […]

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Sharing What You Read by Brad Windhauser

Sharing What You Read by Brad Windhauser Sage advice: Writers Need to Read—And Read Often I’ve blogged about the importance reading has in the role of developing a writer’s understanding and appreciation of the craft. But what you do with this experience should not be restricted to the work you produce: given the wealth of […]

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In the Wake of Tragedy

By Jennie Jarvis The world was shocked Sunday morning to awaken to the news of the Pulse Nightclub shooting here in Orlando, Florida. I found out when my father-in-law sent me a text warning me from going to that area. We don’t have cable, so we had to fight with our television antenna to get […]

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What I’ve Been Reading This Year, with a Special Nod to Laskowski’s Bystanders by Brad Windhauser

What I’ve Been Reading This Year, with a Special Nod to Laskowski’s Bystanders by Brad Windhauser         I’m halfway to my read-50-books-this-year goal, and although I have enjoyed many of the 25 books I have read thus far, I don’t have a favorite. I liked Yanagihara’s A Little Life, although I felt […]

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Guide Your Reader with Smooth, Clear Transitions by Brad Windhauser

Guide Your Reader with Smooth, Clear Transitions by Brad Windhauser When I received notes on my first novel, Regret, one of the first things mentioned related to a character moving from outside to inside. In one paragraph he’s interacting with a person by his car on the street. A few sentences later, he’s inside the […]

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Switch Off Work Brain. Switch On Writer Brain

By Darlene Cah Most writers, even those with published books, have some kind of “day job,” whether they’re teachers, administrative assistants, attorneys, mail carriers or working in any number or other jobs. For some, writing time is a welcome respite from the stress of life in a cube. For me, it’s a difficult transition. My […]

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“As Far as I Know, the Galleys Are Still in Canada” by April L. Ford

This month, author April L. Ford shares one of the lessons she learned transitioning from a writer to a published author.  “As Far as I Know, the Galleys Are Still in Canada” by April L. Ford In summer 2014, when my U.S. publisher asked if any of my Canadian contacts would be interested in helping […]

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Every Line A Break, Every Break A Transition

by Ron Hayes In poetry, transitioning from idea to idea in a poem (or scene to scene, or between characters’ points of view, or what have you) seems a lot less complicated than in other genres of writing. You’d think it’s as simple as beginning a new stanza: end the line, hit the Return key […]

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Making the Leap From Scene to Scene: Transitions

by Jennie Jarvis When sitting down to write a story, it’s so easy to get caught up in “bullet point” thinking: This happens, then this happens, then this happens. But, if you don’t pay attention to the transitions – how you get from point to point – then a reader or viewer can feel like […]

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