Research Tips From A Librarian by Kate Neff

5writers.com welcomes Kate Neff to the site this month! Kate has worked in the library setting for over 15 years, from the public library, to colleges, to the public school system. It’s hard for her to say which is her favorite, but there is never a dull day no matter which kind of library one works […]

, , ,

Leave a comment

When The Muse Is Elusive

by Ron Hayes What does research have to do with poetry and why in the world would a poet ever need to do research? Ever been asked this question? Ever asked it yourself? When the term “research” crops up in a conversation amongst you and your poet friends, do they look at you funny and […]

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Write What You Know—But What If Your Knowledge Hits a Wall? By Brad Windhauser

Write What You Know—But What If Your Knowledge Hits a Wall? By Brad Windhauser Write What You Know. I interpret this oldest-of-writing adages a few different ways. First, I believe it encourages me to explore the things that matter to me. Second, it suggests that I impose my world view on my work—my truth, basically. […]

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

Publication news – Brad Windhauser’s new novel published September 8th

I’m happy to announce that Brad Windhauser’s new Philadelphia-set novel, The Intersection, will be released on September 8th by Black Rose Writing. The story: When a white driver critically injures a black bicyclist, the residents in a tense, gentrifying South Philadelphia neighborhood can’t decide whether to unite, hide, or explode. Ms. Rose wrestles with ways […]

, , ,

Leave a comment

My Big Ol’ Mountain of Books

By Darlene Cah Like all of the writers I know, I have a serious addiction to books, getting lost in the lives of characters that come to life on the page, immersing myself in their problems, their relationships, their exploits, their worlds. I’ll order two or three books, then I’ll get one of the many […]

, , , , ,

1 Comment

The Bard Was Right. To Thine Own Self…

by Ron Hayes Weird year so far. As a poet, I’m deeply affected by the things that go on around me. As a teacher, there always seems to be a lot going on. Typically, these goings-on find their way into the poems I put on the page, but this year has been unusually distracting. With […]

, , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Sharing What You Read by Brad Windhauser

Sharing What You Read by Brad Windhauser Sage advice: Writers Need to Read—And Read Often I’ve blogged about the importance reading has in the role of developing a writer’s understanding and appreciation of the craft. But what you do with this experience should not be restricted to the work you produce: given the wealth of […]

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

In the Wake of Tragedy

By Jennie Jarvis The world was shocked Sunday morning to awaken to the news of the Pulse Nightclub shooting here in Orlando, Florida. I found out when my father-in-law sent me a text warning me from going to that area. We don’t have cable, so we had to fight with our television antenna to get […]

, ,

1 Comment

What I’ve Been Reading This Year, with a Special Nod to Laskowski’s Bystanders by Brad Windhauser

What I’ve Been Reading This Year, with a Special Nod to Laskowski’s Bystanders by Brad Windhauser         I’m halfway to my read-50-books-this-year goal, and although I have enjoyed many of the 25 books I have read thus far, I don’t have a favorite. I liked Yanagihara’s A Little Life, although I felt […]

, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Guide Your Reader with Smooth, Clear Transitions by Brad Windhauser

Guide Your Reader with Smooth, Clear Transitions by Brad Windhauser When I received notes on my first novel, Regret, one of the first things mentioned related to a character moving from outside to inside. In one paragraph he’s interacting with a person by his car on the street. A few sentences later, he’s inside the […]

, , ,

Leave a comment